Complex Made Simple

Make yourself scarce and find yourself in demand

Play hard to get and get the job or position that you want

If you find yourself approached by hiring managers or potential client, respond in a way that respects their interest without coming across as too eager Power in a negotiation often comes from the ability to walk away from the table Desperation is a stench smelt miles away

A story appearing in the NewYork Times (NYT) got the attention of LinkedIn and now has ours as well.

The story goes against every principle you are taught, and yet it makes all the sense in the world.

Take your time- Don’t be prompt

Appearing readily available can work against you, according to Jeremy Nicholson, a social psychologist, the NYT writes. If you’re in low supply and in high demand, you’re worth more.

If you’re overly excited about a work opportunity, that by itself might communicate that you are in low demand.

If you find yourself approached by hiring managers or potential clients, Dr. Nicholson recommends responding in a way that respects their interest without coming across as too eager.  

Be confident and assertive, Dr. Nicholson advises, with responses like: “Well, I do have a couple of other projects that I’m working on. However, I could prioritize this for you if you want.”

LinkedIn responses

The value of not being available

People generally want more of something that’s in short supply, says LinkedIn. The same principle can be applied to our careers. Also, it’s best to fully consider a move before saying yes. After all, power in a negotiation often comes from the ability to walk away from the table.

Tim Herrera, Smarter Living Editor at The New York Times said “conventional wisdom tells us we should eagerly embrace every opportunity that comes our way, playing a little hard to get has its advantages. Study after study has shown that opportunities are seen to be more valuable as they become less available, meaning that people want more of what they have.” He was quoting Robert Cialdini, a leading expert on influence and the author of “Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade.”

“What the scarcity principle says is that people are more attracted to those options or opportunities that are rare, unique or dwindling in availability,” Dr. Cialdini said.

Phillip Boeding, Talent Acquisition Innovator, FinTech Investor, Entrepreneur, said “It's a fine line between enthusiasm and demonstrating you are happy to walk away from the opportunity. Finding that sweet spot is a key to success not only in finding a job. Desperation is a stench smelt miles away”

J. Mike Smith, Executive, leadership and startup team coach said “This is good advice; it's not playing hard to get but rather smart to get.”