7 Easy ways to multiply your conversions with Dynamic Content
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7 Easy ways to multiply your conversions with Dynamic Content

7 Easy ways to multiply your conversions with Dynamic Content

Personalized content is the best forward to market- So what are the strategies?

  • Amazon pioneered the use of dynamic content in the retail space
  • Delivering dynamic content to users in email campaigns is a great way to increase open rates and conversions
  • On large websites with hundreds or thousands of pages, search bars can become user-unfriendly very quickly

By: SharpSpring: the marketing automation platform of choice for more than 1,200 digital marketing agencies and their 6,000+ clients

To put this into context, five years ago people were awed when Amazon could recommend a product they’d love. Today, users expect that Netflix will recommend to them another binge-worthy series based on their tastes. In fact, nearly 74% of users get frustrated with websites that don’t deliver personalized content. So how does a marketer meet this high demand for personalized communications?  

What Is Dynamic Content?

Simply put, dynamic content refers to elements of a website or email that change depending on a user’s information or past behavior. An offer on a web page might change for a first-time visitor versus a visitor with a high lead score who is likely ready to buy. Or a clothing retailer showing a banner ad for a pair of jeans similar to the pair that you bought from the site last week. Ultimately, dynamic content creates a personalized experience for every individual user.  


Image by SharpSpring 


Amazon

Amazon pioneered the use of dynamic content in the retail space. You know those ads for suggested products that you see when you first go on the website or when you click on a product that you’re interested in? That’s dynamic content.

Netflix

Netflix also tracks what you’ve watched and for how long to provide personalized recommendations of programs you might like. This means that when you log into your Netflix account, you’ll see something completely different compared to when your spouse or sibling logs into theirs.

Google

Google will deliver personalized content based on your location. So if a person in Chicago and a person in Seattle both search for “coffee near me,” they’ll see completely different results.

Other Prime Examples

Using dynamic geo-location, Domino’s Pizza will give a user the closest store based on their location. Hilton Hotels will serve up different offers based upon a user’s indicated travel plans. Udemy, an online learning platform, will offer course recommendations based on a user’s purchase history, and YouTube has a constantly updated list of recommendations based on previous viewing history. FitBit tracks your food, exercise, sleep and weight profile based on your goals upon signup. It then sends regular emails about your goals throughout the day.


Image by SharpSpring


7 Ways You Can Use Dynamic Content

1. Landing Pages

Consider the impact of delivering a personalized message to every user. The details will, of course, depend on the product. Start by integrating the lead’s name into the page design, and then reference products the lead has already used. Go one step further by personalizing the call to action.

2. Email

Delivering dynamic content to users in email campaigns is a great way to increase open rates and conversions. Content can be changed depending on the user’s location or browsing history in the same way it works on your landing pages.

3. Forms

With dynamic content, a site can offer a better user experience by delivering personalized forms. When a visitor is identified as “known” versus “unknown,” the site can present variations on forms displayed or hide them altogether. For example, an unknown visitor might receive a form with a special offer whereas a known visitor might simply need to confirm his email address.

4. Redirects

Another way to convert users into customers is by using redirects. If a user has been seeking more information about Hawaii, for example, he could be redirected to a page about Maui. Redirects can happen almost instantaneously, and the visitor may not even realize that they’ve been redirected.

5. Pop-Ups

By using real-time  signals, such as the time spent on a page, length of inactivity, scroll activity or user clicks, you can deliver intelligent pop-ups to achieve a specific action. Usually, this will be to prevent a visitor from leaving the website without first entering into your sales funnel.

6. Personalized Recommendations

Both Amazon and Netflix use data-driven recommendations to encourage users to purchase more items (in the case of Amazon) or continue their subscription (in the case of Netflix).

7. Dynamic Searches

On large websites with hundreds or thousands of pages, search bars can become user-unfriendly very quickly. Here, use individual user data as well as site-wide data to deliver a personalized, user-friendly experience. One method would be to suggest the most frequent search queries. Alternatively (or in addition), the site can deliver results based on a user’s previous preferences.

Author
AMEinfo Staff

AMEinfo staff members report business news and views from across the Middle East and North Africa region, and analyse global events impacting the region today.

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