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A brave new hiring world: Candidates that dictate what they want

Now that the need for talent is heating up again, as the world and businesses emerge from COVID-19, candidates may have the upper hand on who they want to work for and how

Job seekers are likely to find that potential employers are more accepting of remote working arrangements Job applicants can ask for more during the hiring process instead of just accepting what’s offered When you have any special skills, you have more control over where you can work, and how much you can earn

For once, the tables are turned. Now that the need for talent is heating up again, as the world and businesses emerge from COVID-19, candidates may have the upper hand on who they want to work for and how.

Recruiters see a bright future for job seekers over the next few months, and one of the reasons is that they get power back as job openings increase and competition for talent heats up.

Also, job seekers can expect companies to be more open to remote work arrangements. The former may not have a say in this matter. 

Let’s start with the obvious: Remote work.

Working remotely

The jury is still out on whether employees want a return to the office or not. Some studies show a thirst for going back to workplace camaraderie and face-to-face contact while other research reflects a reluctance to abandon the flexibility of remote work. 

Many companies are currently trying to strike a balance between in-office work and remote arrangements for their employees.  

however, job seekers are likely to find that potential employers are more accepting of remote working arrangements than before the pandemic, which by the way allows employers greater access to top talent from outside their local areas.

“Firms that are at a competitive disadvantage in attracting local candidates will be able to attract higher-quality candidates on a remote basis,” wrote Richard Fisher, an HR consultant.

In fact, some companies that won’t allow employees to work from home may find themselves at a disadvantage. Job seekers choosing between two or more similar offers may select the one that will allow him or her to work from home a few days a week than the offer from a company that requires them to be in an office every day.

Contingent work (or gig economy) is also an option on the table today but was a viable hiring strategy even before the pandemic when 34% of the workforce was contingent but 80% of large companies surveyed planned to increase freelance workers.  

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Read: Addressing the talent shortfall in technology

Power to the working people

Job seekers have felt powerless for most of the pandemic but today competition for talent is heating up and it’s putting job candidates in the driver’s seat. 

The result is job seekers can ask for more during the hiring process instead of just accepting what’s offered.

“I am seeing the war for talent heating up right now. Candidates are getting multiple job offers and our clients have needed to offer more than they planned, wrote Chuck Klein, who is a recruiter.

To help solidify applicants’ negotiating position, Lindsey Pollak, who is the author of Recalculating: Navigate Your Career Through the Changing World of Work suggested they take a few steps when selecting a job. 

“First, a person should have measured expectations. They should apply and do their research. They should know their non-negotiables,” she writes. 

Here are 3 more reasons why the power is in the hands of candidates:

1- Employers have to prove their worth too 

Employers are going to do their best to sell you on the job, but applicants need to turn the tables around and start asking questions to make sure that what is being sold to them actually works for candidates.   

2- Toot your own horn 

When you have any special skills, you have more control over where you can work, how much you can earn, and how exciting is your benefits package. And the good news is everyone has special skills: They might be soft skills, leadership skills, advanced training skills, knowledge of software or machinery, and more.  

3- You’re an online star 

In today’s tech-savvy world, anyone with a strong online presence, like a complete LinkedIn profile, online portfolio, or website, has an edge over the competition and can attract a potential employer.