Complex Made Simple

Cloning pets and animals now common practice. Is cloning humans next?

Companies are advertising their pet cloning services, bringing once cuddly furry animals back from the dead. Will ethics get in the way of human cloning?

A Beijing biotechnology group has produced China’s first cloned kitten and people are already signing up for the commercial service that is coming Cats could be cloned by Sinogene for “as little as” $35,400 while cloning dogs cost just around $53,550 The United Nations passed the Declaration on Human Cloning stating that all forms of human cloning were wrong

23 years have passed since Dolly, a sheep, became the first animal successfully cloned from an adult cell

Now companies are advertising their pet cloning services, bringing once cuddly furry animals back from the dead and into their owners’ loving hands. 

But it’s not just pets. Horses, cows, and monkeys are getting a new lease on life, and, one day, extinct animals like dinosaurs and Mammoths will roam the planet once again.

A real Jurassic Park movie is playing out.

What about humans, deceased or still breathing? Are they next in line?

The answers will surprise you.

It’s cloning cats and dogs

A Beijing biotechnology group has produced China’s first cloned kitten and people are already signing up for the commercial service that is coming.

The Sinogene, a Biotechnology Company in Beijing experimenting in cat cloning since August 2018, is now booking appointments. China’s first cloned cat, “Garlic,” has created massive retail interest since her July 21 appearance 66 days after the successful implantation of the cat’s embryo cells into a surrogate mother. 

The clones don’t inherit a memory of their past lives. So Sinogene now plans to develop AI-based programs to pass memories from source animals down to their cloned counterparts. 

Image by The Sun

So far, Sinogene has also cloned 20 dogs and has 20 more orders for the first quarter of 2019, aiming to grow and clone 500 dogs annually within 5 years.

The company also clones horses.

Hefty price tag to bring them back

In 2018 Chinese spent $16.5 billion on 50 million pets, up by 20.5% over the previous year.

There are an estimated 73 million pet owners in China who either own a cat or a dog. Cats could be cloned by Sinogene for “as little as” $35,400 while cloning dogs cost just around $53,550, as advertised. 

Potential beneficial uses of cellular implantation 

Ethics aside, cellular implantation via interspecies experimentations to save endangered animals is the most impressive use for this technology.

The Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences is continuing attempts to inject panda body cells into enucleated eggs from cats.

According to Nature, the Japanese government has approved the development of animal embryos containing human cells, which could then be transplanted into surrogate animals and grown to term. scientists may be able to harvest the organs of these hybrid creatures and transplant them into people.

Cloning technology has led to new treatments for rare, devastating diseases, says Shoukhrat Mitalipov, director of the Oregon Health & Science University Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy. 

According to Discover magazine, he’s devised a way to keep women with mitochondrial diseases from passing on the devastating illness to their children by transferring the nucleus of one of her eggs into the healthy egg cell of another woman (whose nucleus has been removed). It’s a technique that results in a so-called “three-parent baby.”

Another “three-parent baby” was born in Mexico in 2016 with a similar technique intended to avoid passing on a disease carried by the mother.

And recently, falling in the realm of DNA printing, SGI-DNA announced the launch of the Multi-Tile Assembly Cloning (MTAC) application for its BioXp™ 3200 System, a synthetic genomics workstation that generates high-quality synthetic DNA, genes and clones. Scientists could now synthesize two genes and clone them, accelerating efforts in drug discovery, metabolic and protein engineering.

Cloning getting serious with chimps…and humans? 

In 2018, a group of scientists cloned two monkeys. The Chinese government supports research and DNA tests.

Darwinists would believe that this takes us a whole lot closer to cloning people.

The United Nations passed the Declaration on Human Cloning stating that all forms of human cloning were wrong.

Last year, Prof He Jiankui announced that he had edited the genes of two girls to make them immune to HIV, sparking a storm of criticisms over the ethics of the operation.

Last year, a Chinese scientist named He Jiankui claimed to have created the world's first gene-edited human babies.

Jiankui also revealed a second woman was pregnant from his experiments.

An official investigation in China confirmed his illegal experiments, leading to He Jiankui being sacked from his university job.

How does cloning work?

In somatic cell nuclear transfer — the technical term for cloning — a cell is copied by transferring its nucleus into a donated egg cell whose own nucleus has been removed. A quick electric shock stimulates the egg to start dividing, and because its nucleus comes from an adult cell, it doesn’t need sperm to become an embryo. After dividing for a few days, the mass consists of embryonic stem cells that are theoretically capable of becoming an organism that is genetically identical to the one it came from.

image by Discover magazine

From extinct to breathing and living again

Back in 2011 scientists discovered the frozen body of a woolly mammoth. Japanese scientists and Harvard University’s genetics guru George Church are working on bringing them back to life. Church claims we’ll have herds of mammoths roaming the Arctic wastes in a few years.

But results have been patchy. 

The bucardo, an animal became the first animal to be both de-extincted as well as the first to go extinct twice.  The animal’s cells had been successfully implanted in a Spanish ibex-goat hybrid female who had carried the clone of Celia to term. It took 57 implantations to achieve this. Tragically, the 2.5-kilogram clone’s life was cut short by a respiratory episode: it lived only 10 minutes.