Complex Made Simple

Is there such a thing as a dream job?

Working professionals are always chasing that particular job ad that promises a great company, greater people, and the greatest environment to work in. Essentially, we all aspire to land that “dream job”

Hiring managers should exercise caution when listing “passion” as a job requirement Job crafting is basically just taking the initiative to personalize your current role Too many hiring managers avoid telling candidates the truth about a job

Working professionals are always chasing that particular job ad that promises a great company, greater people, and the greatest environment to work in. Essentially, we all aspire to land that “dream job”. 

More often than not, once we join, we meet face to face with routine and day-to-day tasks that any job entails. And it kills the dream.

To get a clear picture of the job, potential employees should research the position’s everyday requirements and speak to people who currently have the same job or who have held it in the past, says a BBC Worklife report

Recruiters can help by providing realistic job previews, clearly listing out the glamorous and not-so-glamorous aspects of the job. 

As part of the pitch, they may also want to be open to employee efforts to craft and tweak their jobs and create new opportunities within their organizations.

Fancy jobs that fizzle fast

People land jobs in data science and artificial intelligence, for example, expecting to create brilliant algorithms that will solve big problems. But they often end up having to deal with boring data collection and cleaning tasks. 

Hiring managers should exercise caution when listing “passion” as a job requirement. In an analysis of more than 200 interviews for a project on start-up hiring, passion was a frequent subject of discussion.  

Yet none of the hiring managers who were looking for passion in their prospective employees could describe how they would assess passion in candidates, or why it was important for the specific job being filled.  

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Read: Tired of not getting hired? Getting no job application feedback? No problem

Job Crafting

Between rapid technological changes and shifting customer expectations, many roles can’t adapt quickly enough to stay relevant. If you do what you’re told, you will eventually become redundant. 

Avoid that at all costs by job crafting.

Job crafting is basically just taking the initiative to personalize your current role, to shape it, mold it, and redefine your job so that it feels energizing and stays relevant for the employer and yourself.  

In short, dig deep within yourself and look for those natural talents that make you different, and use those distinctive strengths and interests to make your job exceptional. 

Your thoughts and actions are no longer automatic but rather become part of a story woven into the fabric of your purpose and outcomes.  

Be curious and open to suggestions to help you figure out what new tasks you can take on that are interesting to you and useful to others.

You still have to get the work done in order to get paid. But your work will feel more meaningful. Your job will feel less like a “commute to the weekend.”  

Employers need to tell the truth about jobs

Too many hiring managers avoid telling candidates the truth about a job. Their logic is that if applicants find out how hard they will work or how boring the core of the open jobs is, they will walk away. This is a mistake. To hire effectively, you have to be honest about what working at your firm is like and what it takes to be successful.

If a candidate doesn’t think they match up with your company or the role, they are probably right. Having them decline the role will save you from wasting substantial time and resources on onboarding, training, and starting to rely on a bad hire, who will probably leave prematurely anyway. 

In the era of Glassdoor and LinkedIn, savvy candidates will research the good, bad and ugly about your company before interviewing. If you distort the truth by trying to project a purely positive image, they will know it.

Smart organizations instead use the interview to show that they can be transparent and that they expect the same candor from employees.  

Employers can talk about why your happiest employees love working for the company. But they need to also be frank about the realities of the workplace and the job, like what new candidates may find tough, and the key elements of your corporate culture, which could be a positive for some but not right for everyone.

Research shows that asking direct and blunt questions is the best way to elicit honest answers.   

Neither organizations nor employees benefit when the wrong people are hired. Organizations should take the lead in promoting more truth in the hiring process.