Complex Made Simple

Press the right buttons with an elevator pitch to potential bosses

Using an elevator pitch can show you are capable of taking the lead. In job interviews, this can prove impressive

Elevator pitches (or value propositions) should focus on results, not personality traits or positions held Your elevator pitch eventually needs to communicate your unique selling proposition Make sure to identify what you want, or the “ask” of your pitch

Vaccines are on the way and a new era of business will emerge. Bosses will be looking for remote workers. 

And because the new worker is more independent, the bosses want to make sure you have what it takes.

Using an elevator pitch can show you are capable of taking the lead. In job interviews, this can prove impressive.

You’ll have 30 seconds to grab attention, be it during an interview online and in person, at a business event or recruiting forum, or when ‘stalking’ your prospective boss as he/she has lunch aiming for an ‘accidental’ run in and “Hey, I know you!” recognition factor.

Think of it as your elevator pitch.

Read: The more hands-off the contactless office is, the weirder it gets

What is an elevator pitch?

Abhigyan Chand, Editor at LinkedIn News said a strong pitch can be customized for each meeting and the idea behind them is to sell you and your worth.

“Elevator pitches (or value propositions) should focus on results, not personality traits or positions held. You will be hired to produce results, not just because you have occupied job titles for many years,” Chand said. 

An elevator pitch is a brief, persuasive speech that you can use to spark interest in you, a project, or an idea highlighting what’s unique about any one of them. 

People may not remember everything that you say, but they will likely remember your enthusiasm.

Your elevator pitch eventually needs to communicate your unique selling proposition or USP, i.e. what makes you or your idea, unique. 

Read: In the post-COVID world, employees are the new bosses and here’s what they want

5 elevator pitch steps 

1. Spin a tale to grab attention

Pull in your audience with an exciting story about you, an event, or fact that makes people say “hmm”? 

2. State what’s on your mind

Make sure to identify what you want, or the “ask” of your pitch. Are you looking for project funding, a job, or an introduction to a potential employer?

3. State why

While looking someone straight in the eye, you basically need to show what problems you solve, speaking from knowledge, and experience about unique skills and attributes. What makes you a coveted creator, organizer, achiever, leader, or potential partner?   

4. Ask for a proper meeting

You should next ask for an office meeting or a follow-up call where more time is allocated to discuss points of interest, should they exist.

5. Leave them intrigued 

Throw parting statements like: “Hope I showed all what you have to lose” or “I’m trying to understand what just happened” or “I had no idea two ideas can occupy the same space” and a stunning one like “Don’t get me wrong: you said all the right things”.  That last one leaves them thinking that they will have to work harder to get you, instead of the opposite.