Complex Made Simple

There is a real solution to pain without taking medication: Virtually

Wear a VR headset, go to serene places unknown, and forget your aches and pains

A new study has just been released saying that VR has been shown to ease severe chronic pain in patients VR helped reduce pain across many types of pain - gastrointestinal, cancer, orthopedic, neurologic and others The VR software worked to distract from the discomforts of labor and triggered endorphins and other neurotransmitters that directly relieve pain

Pain is a costly proposition economically.

The Institute of Medicine estimated direct care expenditure and loss of productivity for pain to be $560-$635 billion annually.

We are entering a brave new virtual world where everything from currency to travel and business is becoming part of our fantasy realm.

Enter pains and aches.

Pain is and will always be real, yet science is toiling with the idea of making it part of our flight of imagination.

VR headsets can now play an important role in increasing our pain threshold or even making us forget about it. For a while at least.  For now.

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Imagine yourself pain free with VR

A new study has just been released saying that VR has been shown to ease severe chronic pain in patients.

The pain levels of 120 hospitalized patients were recently recorded as part of a study involving VR.

The starting pain levels were at least a 3 out of 10 over the previous 24 hours – 0 being no pain, and 10 representing extreme hurt.

As per Reuters, the VR patients reported an average decline in pain scores of up to 1.72 points. A control group, asked to watch health videos and programs, meanwhile, revealed a decrease of only 0.46 points on average.

The worse pain a patient was in, the more effective VR turned out to be.

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Those whose pain rating was 7 out of 10 or higher, average pain score reductions were 3.04 points with VR. Without VR, scores were only at 0.93.

“We found that VR helped reduce pain across many types of pain – gastrointestinal, cancer, orthopedic, neurologic, etc. – and that it reduced pain the most in people with the most severe pain,” Dr. Brennan Spiegel, lead author of the study and professor of medicine and public health at the University of California, Los Angeles, told Reuters.

“It creates an illusion of time acceleration, effectively shortening the length of pain episodes.”

The VR experiences ranged from relaxation themes, natural environments, simulated flights, and animated games.

No need to labor child birthing!

On August 9, the University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff announced that it had begun a trial in which VR headsets would be given to women in labor, to relax women and numb the pain, reported Forbes.

Women going through labor were given 360-degree experiences while being shown a beach, an underwater scene, an open landscape illuminated by the aurora borealis, and also a prairie inhabited by a grazing herd of buffalo.

The VR software worked to distract from the discomforts of labor and triggered endorphins and other neurotransmitters that directly relieve pain.

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VR as pain management while hospitalized

Santa Rosa hospital first in North Bay to offer virtual reality as pain management tool

Santa Rosa Memorial, in California is the first hospital in the North Bay to use VR to treat patients as a creative alternative to traditional medication and is one of only three medical centers in California that have VR headsets for pediatric and gynecology patients to help them cope with pain, discomfort and uneasiness.

AppliedVR is a leading national provider of VR headsets designed specifically for healthcare. About 250 hospitals around the world have tested the company’s VR device.

A team of appliedVR engineers create new visualizations and virtual experiences to accompany almost every possible medical situation.

Patients or their guardians get to select from curated virtual reality content.

VR is being thought of as a way to fight opioid use by patients at most U.S. hospitals to relieve pain.

VR as a pain management technique shows a decrease in self-reported pain by almost 25% and an anxiety reduction over 30% in patients who use the VR headsets in high-stress medical situations, according to a report by the Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles, which has been offering VR to its patients since 2004.