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Tired of not getting hired? Getting no job application feedback? No problem

Maybe the times of getting fired are ending, as COVID-19 vaccinations increase, lockdowns ease, and the future of business gets brighter. But getting hired is still depressingly with us

With so many people competing for one job, recruiters are not able to give feedback to those who are unsuccessful Focusing your attention and energy on something you have no control over will only make you feel worse Create a list of bragging rights. Log all of your accomplishments and contributions

Maybe the times of getting fired are ending, as COVID-19 vaccinations increase, lockdowns ease, and the future of business gets brighter.

But getting hired is still difficult and for many, that feeling of rejection is devastating.

What the experts say  

Siobhan Morrin, Editor at LinkedIn News, wrote that job hunting is not only tiring, but can also take a toll on your confidence

And not hearing back from recruiters can be down to the sheer number of applicants, but a lack of feedback could be detrimental to self-esteem, according to psychiatrist Christophe André.  

He advises trying to remain objective about your skills by talking them through with someone neutral, or trying a skills assessment online.

Carol Stewart, Executive & Career Coach, Speaker and Trainer says that more people applying means more people being unsuccessful.  

“With so many people competing for one job, recruiters are not always able to give feedback to those who are unsuccessful. In one situation for an entry-level paralegal role, there were over 4,000 applications. In the absence of feedback, some people imagine the worst, fueling a belief that they are not good enough,” Stewart said.

Feeling discouraged for too long can lead to despondency where we lose hope of ever achieving what it is that we want to achieve.  

She advised to acknowledge how you are feeling because it is ok to be disappointed if you didn’t get the job.  

In the absence of feedback, reflect on whether there was anything glaringly obvious that you could have done differently, but don’t dwell over it.

Focusing your attention and energy on something you have no control over will only make you feel worse, she advises. 

“Continue taking action towards finding a new role. Accept that it may take longer than you would like, and in addition to looking for a job, do things that bring you joy,” Stewart continued, adding that remembering and reliving past successes can only boost your confidence moving forward. 

Read: Save your job by upskilling and reskilling. This is what companies want and need today

Read: Bad economy and fake jobs: India’s growing job employment scams

Develop a resilient mindset 

Resiliency involves meeting challenges or setbacks with a constructive approach and focusing on the opportunities created when things don’t go as planned. 

To become resilient, you must understand that success and rejection go hand-in-hand, and that you simply cannot advance if you always play it safe.

If you’re stuck in a rejection rut, here are four ways to kick your job search back into gear.

1. Deal with the negativity

Rejection creates a “negativity bias” and you can counteract this natural inclination by thinking about the circumstances that could have led to the rejection. For example, while you may think you were turned down because your resume wasn’t quite impressive enough, in reality, the company could have made an internal hire or discontinued the job listing altogether.

2. Remember, it’s part of the process

It’s a hard fact that you’re not going to land every job you apply for. No one does! Coming to grips with this fact and learning to accept rejection as part of the process will help build your mental and emotional armor.

Plus, once you let go of the need for a guaranteed outcome, you open yourself up to a world of other possibilities—other jobs, opportunities, and companies that could be an even better fit.  

3. Stop overanalyzing

What could I have said differently? Was my handshake strong enough? What was wrong with my follow-up email?

You can drive yourself crazy replaying the scene over and over again in your head, ruminating about the reasons you received a rejection. But the truth is, stewing in your own disappointment only serves to keep you stuck in the past.  

4. Build stronger job esteem

If you find yourself constantly downplaying your accomplishments and feeling like a failure, create a list of “bragging rights.” Log all of your accomplishments and contributions, and develop three key stories about times when you overcome an obstacle in the past.