Complex Made Simple

What side effects can the vaccine have on you after you take it?

Here we look at what you can experience after receiving injections of the anti-virus vaccines available on the market. Should you be worried?

A geriatric oncologist at Boston Medical Center said he felt dizzy and had an allergic reaction There are reports of small numbers of people developing anaphylaxis, a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction Some have experienced adverse events such as fatigue and muscle aches

Several vaccines are ready and already millions are being inoculated against COVID-19.

Millions others will initially refuse to be injected with the serum for a variety of reasons ranging from claims that pharma companies have conspired to make billions of dollars from a virus they developed in labs, to denying the existence of COVID-19 altogether.

Many people around the world are also hearing warnings from doctors and experts saying that shooting perfect healthy bodies will vaccines will result in unneeded and immediate side effects while not enough research time was spent looking at longer-term outcomes on our health.

COVID vaccines from Pfizer and partner BioNTech and competitor Moderna were developed in record time during 2020.  

Here we look at what you can experience after receiving injections of the anti-virus vaccines available on the market.  

Read: Scared of needles? More ways to take the COVID-19 vaccine

Doctors reveal what happened to them 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said recently that he experienced few side effects after taking Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine

Speaking to CNN’s Dana Bash, Fauci, said: “The only thing I had was six to ten hours following the vaccine I felt a little bit of an ache in my arm that lasted maybe 24 hours, a little bit more. Then went away and completely other than that I felt no other deleterious types of effects.”

Fauci, 80, said that the side effects were “nothing serious at all,” but added that when he receives the second vaccine booster shot in a few weeks, “I might feel a little bit achy because the immune system will be revving up even more.”

So far, around 9.5 million doses of the vaccine have been distributed in the US, and around 1.9 million Americans have received their first doses of either the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine or the Moderna vaccine according to the Center for Disease Control.

A geriatric oncologist at Boston Medical Center said he felt dizzy and had an allergic reaction minutes after receiving the Moderna vaccine.

The CDC recommends that anyone with a history of anaphylactic shock to things like shellfish or other allergies should wait at least fifteen minutes before leaving a vaccination appointment.

A Boston doctor with a shellfish allergy developed a severe allergic reaction after receiving the Moderna vaccine.

The Moderna vaccine has also been shown to cause an allergic reaction in some people who have had facial fillers. 

Certified dermatologist Dr. Shirley Chi explains: “In these cases, the patients all had swelling and inflammation in the area that was given the filler. All were treated with steroids and anti-histamines and all of their reactions resolved,” she said.

“Your immune system, which causes inflammation, is revved up when you get a vaccine. That’s how it’s supposed to work. So it makes sense that you would see an immune response in certain areas where they see some substance that is not a naturally occurring substance in your body,” Dr. Chi told ABC13.

Exclusive: If a COVID-19 vaccine is ready today, which businesses survive the post-pandemic era?

Side effects 

There are reports of small numbers of people developing anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction like what happens when you’re allergic to peanuts.

But are conclusions being drawn or is this a random event that happens to everyday people unexpectedly?

After all, people do experience strokes, seizures or other syndromes and malaises whose trigger cannot be explained. 

Britain has reported several cases of anaphylaxis among people who have received the Pfizer vaccine. In the U.S., about 11 cases have been reported since the vaccine rollout began earlier in December, according to the CDC. 

Could these reactions have happened because Pfizer and Moderna vaccines use messenger RNA?

The CDC released new guidance on the COVID-19 vaccination process for people with underlying health conditions. The new guidelines follow reports of some health care workers and COVID vaccine recipients experiencing side effects.

In releasing this information, the CDC seeks to assuage the concerns of people with underlying medical conditions, including rare disorders and inflammatory diseases.  

The CDC cites clinical research showing that the COVID vaccine should be safe for the vast majority of people, but that certain groups will require more vigilant monitoring.

Some patients who have already received vaccine doses have experienced adverse events such as fatigue and muscle aches.

The available clinical trial data suggest that side effects vary wildly by age and other factors, such as a history of serious allergies, and they tend to hover between mild and moderate symptoms.